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EU Citizens Working in the UK

By: Louise Smith, barrister - Updated: 25 Feb 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Eu Citizens Working In The Uk

Despite the vote to exit the EU, the UK will still remain a member of the EU until Article 50 negotiations have concluded. This means most citizens of countries in the European Union (EU), the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland have the right to live and work in the UK under European law. European nationals may also bring their family with them to live in the UK. However, to exercise the right to live in the UK nationals of these countries must be able to support themselves and their families without having to rely on public funds.

Anyone working in the UK must register with Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs and are liable to pay income tax and national insurance contributions provided their income exceeds the tax-free minimum.

Working in the UK

European nationals with the right to live in the UK are, with certain exceptions, are still entitled to work in the UK and do not need to obtain a visa or work permit in order to do so. European nationals have the same rights as UK citizens in this respect, and employers must treat them equally. An employer who treats an EEA or Swiss worker differently purely because he is not from the UK is guilty of discrimination.

EEA nationals and their family members can be employed, self-employed or start their own businesses in the UK. If the family members of an EEA national exercising his right to live in the UK are not themselves EEA or Swiss nationals they will have to apply for an EEA family permit before they travel to the UK.

Remaining in the UK

EU nationals who have lawfully resided in the UK for at least five years automatically have permanent residence. After six years, EU nationals who have lived continuously and lawfully in the UK are eligible to apply for British citizenship.

Croatian Nationals

Due to the transitional arrangements that were put in place when Croatia joined the EU in 2013,Croatian nationals may have to apply for a registration certificate to be allowed to work in the UK. This will depend on whether they need permission to work in the UK, and what they will be doing. Applications will continue to be processed as usual, despite the Brexit vote.

Document checks to work in the UK

To find out if a potential employee has the right to work in the UK and what documents employers should check, or if you want to find out which documents you, as an employee need to produce to prove you’re eligible to work in the UK, please see link here.

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[Add a Comment]
Hi, Thanks for this article. Would you be able to provide any advice for EU migrants coming to the UK after the triggering of Article 50? If I understand correctly, we have no current guarantees that they will be permitted to stay (or not stay...) on a permanent basis and that their status depends on negotiations with the EU that should occurr following the triggering of Article 50. I realise there is lots of speculation at the moment and that everything depends on negotiations, it's just so incredibly frustrating and nervewracking that we have no information on what will happen in the future. It is almost like trying to plan for a future on quick-sand! Thank you!
Itue - 25-Feb-17 @ 11:04 AM
kokosnoot - Your Question:
Hi, I'm a Dutch citizen. I'm an actor and artist. I wanted to go attend a course and probably remain in the UK to work in the industry. I can fund myself for at least a year. Can I just move or do I need a special visa or procedure? Also, do I register at the home office upon arrival?

Our Response:
As referred to in the article, despite the vote to exit the EU, the UK will still remain a member of the EU until Article 50 negotiations have concluded. This means most citizens of countries in the European Union (EU), the European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland have the right to live and work in the UK under European law. As long as you can self-fund you can come to the UK without having to apply for a visa.
AboutImmigration - 20-Feb-17 @ 11:50 AM
Hi, I'm a Dutch citizen. I'm an actor and artist. I wanted to go attend a course and probably remain in the UK to work in the industry. I can fund myself for at least a year. Can I just move or do I need a special visa or procedure? Also, do I register at the home office upon arrival?
kokosnoot - 19-Feb-17 @ 1:20 PM
I have just seen a job vacancy advertised for a business in Berkshire. At the end of the ad, says No overseas aplicants should apply". Is this discrimination? Can I report it? Where? Thanks.
Farringdon - 18-Feb-17 @ 11:43 AM
I have worked in UK have got NI and bank account as a student on Indian passport .I amgoing to change my nationality to Portuguese will I able to take a job and continge with the previous Nationalinsurance number.
Luma - 11-Feb-17 @ 2:29 PM
Hi there, I'm a spanish citizen and I worked in the UK for nearly 5 years paying the mandatory taxes. After that I moved to Germany, which is still now my current residence and where I work. What will happen with my taxes after Brexit? Will I lose them for my future pension in retirement? Thanks, Ana
Ana - 11-Feb-17 @ 8:11 AM
Hi my name is joshua i am from Hungary have lived in england for jus. Over 10 years my passpirt has expired and i have to wait until i am 18yrs old witch will be in 5 months to be able to renew it i have got a hungarian birth certificate and a british national insurance number would i be able to get a job with my b- c and insurance number can you pls help me out pretty desperate
joshy17 - 7-Feb-17 @ 12:44 AM
Petogyam - Your Question:
My wife is an EU national and has been living in the Uk for the past 11years. However she just applied for a residence certificate and I also applied for a residence card as a non EEA national. Will this brexit affect us? And if so what are the likely steps we could take

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here which should explain all you need to know.
AboutImmigration - 6-Feb-17 @ 10:04 AM
My wife is an EU national and has been living in the Uk for the past 11years. However she just applied for a residence certificate and I also applied for a residence card as a non EEA national. Will this brexit affect us? And if so what are the likely steps we could take
Petogyam - 5-Feb-17 @ 1:40 AM
Flexible - Your Question:
Hi there,I am a European living in the UK now for 17years. I've studied at University and after I have a casual contract. I wanted to have information from my workplace regarding PR.that's what they've answered me : I have had similar requests in the past, and I'm afraid we can't use that exact form as you are a casual worker rather than an employee. Ihave however set out all the required information on the attached letter, as the form states that a letter will be sufficient.My question : Is the term 'casual worker' enough evidence applying for PR status ? Or do I have to leave the country in 2019?Or do you need to have a proper employment letter either part time status or full employed? By the way I work for 9 years at my workplace and ruffly 20 - 28h per week but under a flexible contract.Let me know your thoughts pleaseThanks for looking into thisF*

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here which should answer your question.
AboutImmigration - 18-Jan-17 @ 10:52 AM
Hi there, I am a European living in the UK now for 17years. I've studied at University and after I have a casual contract. I wanted to have information from my workplace regarding PR. that's what they've answered me : I have had similar requests in the past, and I'm afraid we can't use that exact form as you are a casual worker rather than an employee. I have however set out all the required information on the attached letter, as the form states that a letter will be sufficient. My question : Is the term 'casual worker'enough evidence applying for PR status ? Or do I have to leave the country in 2019? Or do you need to have a proper employment letter either part time status or full employed? By the way I work for 9 years at my workplace and ruffly 20 - 28h per week but under a flexible contract. Let me know your thoughts please Thanks for looking into this F*
Flexible - 17-Jan-17 @ 12:52 PM
Mkali - Your Question:
Hi I would like to ask about working in the UK & what is recuired from me & do I have to get visa or what can I have so that I can live in the UK & work btw I'm 18yrs old (norwegian) I would like your help plz as first as possible

Our Response:
You can check via the gov.uk link here.
AboutImmigration - 17-Jan-17 @ 10:41 AM
pet - Your Question:
I am romanian I have worked as fork lift truck driver for 2 years 3 months always in the same job for agency will anything change for me once brexit happens as at the oment I can work here with no permit. will companies also have to pay a fee to keep forign people on

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here which will outline your rights.
AboutImmigration - 16-Jan-17 @ 12:25 PM
Hi i would like to ask about working in the UK & what is recuired from me & do i have to get visa or what can i have so that i can live in the UK & work btw i'm 18yrs old (norwegian) i would like your help plz as first as possible
Mkali - 16-Jan-17 @ 4:22 AM
i am romanian i have worked as fork lift truck driver for 2 years 3 months always in the same job for agency will anything change for me once brexit happens as at the oment i can work here with no permit. will companies also have to pay a fee to keep forign people on
pet - 15-Jan-17 @ 4:40 PM
I am asking on behalf of a friend here in France.He has been offered casual work in UK and wants to know if he can declare his earnings to the UK Inland Revenue.And If so what paperwork would his UK employer needs to see. If he needs to register to pay NIC can he do this from France.
B - 4-Jan-17 @ 4:40 PM
Hi, I am santosh, Non EU national, from Nepal. Married to EU national, currently living in Spain, recently got the resident permit in Spain. I wish to live and work in UK, My question is if you can advice the necessary requirements to live and work in UK. Thank you
MasantosG - 27-Dec-16 @ 10:19 PM
Hi, I work for a UK company from abroad. I am a Croatian national. I pay into NI, I mean my company does, for me. Is it possible for me to move to UK and work from there? Or would I be better positioned to register as self employed in UK? Could that lead to work permit? Thanks
key - 15-Dec-16 @ 10:10 PM
Stella- Your Question:
Hi I am a eu citizens (Italy) can l still come to UK to work after march 2017

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here which will explain your position further.
AboutImmigration - 15-Dec-16 @ 11:29 AM
Hi I am a eu citizens (Italy) can l still come to UK to work after march 2017
Stella - 14-Dec-16 @ 9:53 PM
Mich- Your Question:
Hi, I am an EU citizen, and my boyfriend is a non- Eu citizen and is currently living in Kuwait, I have been in the Uk for the past one year and trying to get him to the uk what's the best possible way to bring him here

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here.The best and only way of being granted permission for your boyfriend to live here is to satisfy the requirements laid out in the article.
AboutImmigration - 28-Nov-16 @ 12:49 PM
andy - Your Question:
Hi, my girlfriend from Switzerland is wanting to come over in spring 2017 to live and work in yorkshire but she is a bit worried because of brexit(artitcle 50). Is there any advice or websites you can recommend? Thanks.

Our Response:
Please see gov.uk link here which explains the Brexit situation more clearly.
AboutImmigration - 28-Nov-16 @ 12:42 PM
Hi. I've moved to UK from Finland because of my studies. My wife and my 3 year old have moved with me. Because I'm a full time student in UK, I don't have to pay council tax. My wife is a full time student in Finland and doing distant studies from UK back to her Uni in Helsinki. Hence she is under Finnish social system and is not entitled to receive any support from UK. My question is, whether she is also exempt from council tax?
Tim - 27-Nov-16 @ 6:22 PM
hi, my girlfriend from Switzerland is wanting to come over in spring 2017 to live and work in yorkshire but she is a bit worried because of brexit(artitcle 50). Is there any advice or websites you can recommend? Thanks.
andy - 27-Nov-16 @ 5:16 PM
Hi, I am an EU citizen, and my boyfriend is a non- Eu citizen and is currently living in Kuwait, I have been in the Uk for the past one year and trying to get him to the uk what's the best possible way to bring him here
Mich - 25-Nov-16 @ 1:02 AM
Hi, I am an Indian national, I am in relationship with a Lithuanian national since 6 years, recently been engaged and planning to get married in Feb 2017 in Lithuania, we are considering UK as an option to move, I have few queries: 1. Will, getting married in Lithuania and then move to UK, creates any complications in getting temporary stay in UK for me. 2. OR Is it better to move first and registered our marriage in UK itself? 3. What are the possibilities that UK remains in EU with no restrictions on Borders? What are the latest update on Article 50, do you think that in December it can be more clear? Regards
DAT - 20-Nov-16 @ 1:42 PM
Ady - Your Question:
Hi!I'm a UE citizen(Bulgarian) and I came to Uk February 2011,starting to work as a self-employed in April 2011,until April 2014(in the mean time I get the yellow card and after that blue card).From April 2014 until November 2014 I haven't worked at all (I tried to do some training course),but I maintained my self-employed status and I paid NI(I didn't claimed any benefits).From Nov 2014 I became employee.My question is how those 8 months without work will affect my permanent residence application.Thank you!

Our Response:
EU nationals who have lived continuously and lawfully in the UK for at least five years automatically have a permanent right to reside. This means that they have a right to live in the UK permanently, in accordance with EU law. Please see link here.
AboutImmigration - 16-Nov-16 @ 10:49 AM
Hi!I'm a UE citizen(Bulgarian) and I came to Uk February 2011,starting to work as a self-employed in April 2011,until April 2014(in the mean time I get the yellow card and after that blue card).From April 2014 until November 2014 I haven't worked at all (I tried to do some training course),but I maintained my self-employed status and I paid NI(I didn't claimed any benefits).From Nov 2014 I became employee.My question is how those 8 months without work will affect my permanent residence application.Thank you!
Ady - 15-Nov-16 @ 11:56 AM
hello, im from croatia, and have researched some information about how i can come to the uk and work, my boyfriend lives in oxford, and we have been together for over 5 years, im in the uk now and staying until February, and would like to work temporary, i have had some job interviews and not to sure about what to do, i have printed out a blue certificate, as i have studied at university in a degree of design but didnt complete my 3rd year, but have a certificate in college. I would like to live in the uk next year 2017, with my boyfriend and work permently, so what ever is the best way of going forward, could you please let me know..
Tea - 14-Nov-16 @ 5:26 PM
Locamilagra - Your Question:
Hi,I am from Eu union and permament resident in UK. My mum is from Latvia as well and she came to live with us for quite a while as she is looking after our baby as I went back to work after maternity.We have never claimed any benefits but she is 62 years old and one thing we need just NHS. Is she allowed to use it? She would definitely stay in UK for another 3-4 years or even longer.Thanks

Our Response:
Your mother's entitlement to free NHS treatment depends on the length and purpose of her residence in the UK, not her nationality, please see CAB link here and NHS link here. I hope this helps answer your question.
AboutImmigration - 28-Oct-16 @ 12:41 PM
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